With 14 full-time faculty members and nearly 200 majors, we are the largest undergraduate-only anthropology department in the United States. The Department of Anthropology is committed to a comparative and holistic approach to the study of the human experience. The anthropological perspective provides a broad understanding of the origins as well as the meaning of physical and cultural diversity in the world - past, present, and future. As such, the program in anthropology offers the opportunity for understanding world affairs and problems within the total context of the human experience and for constructing solutions to world problems which are firmly grounded in that context. Cultural anthropologists study people and their cultural practices and beliefs both within and outside of the United States as well as the topics of identity, power, inequality, and social praxis. Archaeologists study the material culture of past peoples in order to reconstruct their cultures, traditions, and practices in order to understand both what came before and how this may help us understand the present. Biological anthropologists study primate evolution and behavioral ecology, human biological variation, biocultural adaptations, bioarchaeology, and human paleontology. Together, we strive to understand both past and present variation in human societies. [ Why study anthropology? ]

News

Dr. Thomas Whyte publishes new book on Boone's history before 1769

Dr. Thomas Whyte, Professor of Anthropology, has just published a new book on the history of Boone and Northwestern North Carolina, Boone Before Boone...

Dr. Gwendolyn Robbins Schug named Co-Editor-in-Chief of Bioarchaeology International

Dr. Gwendolyn Robbins Schug named Co-Editor-in-Chief of Bioarchaeology Internationalhttps://floridapress.blog/2020/07/09/bioarchaeology-international-...

Dr. Susan E. Keefe publishes new book on Black Appalachian oral histories

Dr. Susan E. Keefe, Professor Emerita of Anthropology, has published a new edited book on Black Appalachian oral histories, Junaluska: Oral Histories ...

Department of Anthropology Statement of Solidarity

We, the faculty of the Department of Anthropology at Appalachian State University stand with our Black students, colleagues, and community members in ...

Five anthropology majors successfully defend honors theses

Five anthropology majors successfully defended honors theses this academic year to earn Departmentental Honors and/or graduate from the Honors College...

Rachel Anderson selected for the American Indian Language Development Institute

Anthropology major, Rachel Anderson, has been selected to participate in this summer's American Indian Language Development Institute at the...

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  • Abbey Huber, Social Practice and Sustainability major

    After taking a few classes in political science and global studies, Abbey Huber did not feel that the frameworks she had encountered in these classes compelled her. During her first year, and after some exasperation, Abbey’s Honors advisor suggested that she take Native America through Ethnography with Dr. Dana Powell. Taking that class, she cites, is what drove her to change her major to Anthropology.