We have one of the fastest growing departments with nearly 175 majors and the largest undergraduate-only anthropology program in North Carolina and the third largest program overall (behind UNC Chapel Hill and Duke University). We offer both B.S. and B.A. degrees in several fields of anthropology. The Department has 12 full time tenure-track faculty (4 tenured full professors, 1 tenured associate professor, 7 untenured assistant professors) and 2 full time lecturers. 

We maintain rigorous standards in the classroom and many of our students continue on to graduate school, postgraduate internships, and land jobs upon graduation using ideas that were sparked at Appalachian State. Our teachers aspire to provide the highest quality of education that extends beyond the classroom into the field (both domestically and internationally) through our numerous research possibilities for students. Over the years, four of our faculty have been inducted into the College of Arts & Sciences Academy of Outstanding Teachers. In addition to excellence in teaching, we maintain one of the highest standards of research productivity in the College. Our faculty members have been awarded 5 of the scholar of the year awards (junior and senior levels) given by the College of Arts & Sciences in the past 19 years. FAST FACTS ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT

DEPARTMENT MISSION
The Department of Anthropology is committed to a comparative and holistic approach to the study of the human experience. The anthropological perspective provides a broad understanding of the origins as well as the meaning of physical and cultural diversity in the world - past, present, and future. As such, the program in anthropology offers the opportunity for understanding world affairs and problems within the total context of the human experience and for constructing solutions to world problems which are firmly grounded in that context. Cultural anthropologists study people and their cultural practices and beliefs both within and outside of the United States as well as the topics of identity, power, inequality, and social praxis. Archaeologists study the material culture of past peoples in order to reconstruct their cultures, traditions, and practices in order to understand both what came before and how this may help us understand the present. Biological anthropologists study primate evolution and behavioral ecology, human biological variation, biocultural adaptations, bioarchaeology, and human paleontology. Together, we strive to understand both past and present variation in human societies. [ Why study anthropology? ]

News

Dr. Timothy J. Smith has been appointed to ACLS national selection committee
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 5:01pm

Dr. Timothy J. Smith has been appointed to the national selection committee of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/American Council of Learned Societies Dissertation Completion Fellowship Program.

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Dr. Dana Powell named a "Faculty Member of Distinction" in Appalachian Magazine
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 4:39pm

Dr. Dana Powell has been named a "Faculty Member of Distinction" in Appalachian Magazine. Her research covers the cultural politics of energy development, political ecology, and critical Native/Indigenous studies.

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Dr. Tom Whyte named a "Faculty Member of Distinction" in Appalachian Magazine
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 4:34pm

Dr. Tom Whyte has been named a "Faculty Member of Distinction" in Appalachan Magazine. His areas of research include southern Appalachian prehistoric archaeology, zooarchaeology and experimental archaeology.

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Featured Stories

Dr. Tom Whyte and students highlighted in Appalachian magazine for archaeological research
Wednesday, October 28, 2009 - 5:16pm

Carefully digging, scraping and sifting. It's how archeologists seek clues into human history. Students at Appalachian State University learn these skills—and find cool artifacts—in a field archeology course each summer. In an Ashe County cow pasture this past summer, students led by Dr. Tom Whyte examined the earth for traces left behind by early Native Americans.

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Alumni spotlights

Alumnae Sarah Perry and Janelle Wienke, HandMade in America

Sarah Perry (2014) and Janelle Wienke (2011) working for change at HandMade in America.

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Faculty spotlights

Dr. Thomas R. Whyte, Professor of Anthropology

Dr. Tom Whyte’s research includes southern Appalachian prehistoric archaeology, zooarchaeology, and experimental archaeology. His recent research includes studies of animal remains from archaeological sites throughout the Southeast.

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Social Media Links

Goto the Department of Anthropology Facebook site.

Please consider donating to the Department by selecting "Other" and designating your gift for one of the following funds:

Anthropology Speaker Series
Anthropology Loucks Fund
Anthropology Weller Fund 
Anthropology Keefe Fund
Anthropology Foundation 

Your gift is appreciated and allows us to achieve even greater success with our amazing students! 

Physical Location

The Department of Anthropology is located in Anne Belk Hall. The administrative office is located in Room 342 and all of the faculty offices, classrooms, and labs are located on the 3rd floor.

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