We have one of the fastest growing departments with nearly 150 majors and the largest undergraduate-only anthropology program in North Carolina and the third largest program overall (behind UNC Chapel Hill and Duke University). We offer both B.S. and B.A. degrees in several fields of anthropology. The Department has 11 full time tenure-track faculty (3 tenured full professors, 2 tenured associate professors, 6 untenured assistant professors) and 2 lecturers. Despite the small number of faculty, the Department ranks #4 in the College of Arts & Sciences for the amount of degrees produced and #4 for amount of majors relative to the number of tenure line faculty. 

We maintain rigorous standards in the classroom and many of our students continue on to graduate school, postgraduate internships, and land jobs upon graduation using ideas that were sparked at Appalachian State. Our teachers aspire to provide the highest quality of education that extends beyond the classroom into the field (both domestically and internationally) through our numerous research possibilities for students. Over the years, four of our faculty have been inducted into the College of Arts & Sciences Academy of Outstanding Teachers. In addition to excellence in teaching, we maintain one of the highest standards of research productivity in the College. Our faculty members have been awarded 5 of the scholar of the year awards (junior and senior levels) given by the College of Arts & Sciences in the past 19 years. FAST FACTS ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT

DEPARTMENT MISSION
The Department of Anthropology is committed to a comparative and holistic approach to the study of the human experience. The anthropological perspective provides a broad understanding of the origins as well as the meaning of physical and cultural diversity in the world - past, present, and future. As such, the program in anthropology offers the opportunity for understanding world affairs and problems within the total context of the human experience and for constructing solutions to world problems which are firmly grounded in that context. Cultural anthropologists study people and their cultural practices and beliefs both within and outside of the United States as well as the topics of identity, power, inequality, and social praxis. Archaeologists study the material culture of past peoples in order to reconstruct their cultures, traditions, and practices in order to understand both what came before and how this may help us understand the present. Biological anthropologists study primate evolution and behavioral ecology, human biological variation, biocultural adaptations, bioarchaeology, and human paleontology. Together, we strive to understand both past and present variation in human societies. [ Why study anthropology? ]

News

Anthropology Alumnus Christopher Moore (B.S. '97) publishes article in Nature
Monday, March 13, 2017 - 11:58am

Anthropology Alumnus Christopher Moore (B.S. '97) publishes article in Nature on platinum anomaly in North American sedimentary sequences

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Dr. Susan Lappan awarded Fulbright grant for primate research in Southeast Asia
Monday, March 13, 2017 - 11:44am

Dr. Susan Lappan of the Department of Anthropology at Appalachian State University received a Fulbright award for her forthcoming research on primate ecology in peninsular Malaysia, entitled “Conservation of the Malaysian Siamang in a Changing World.”

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Anthropology alumna Caroline Federal wins best dissertation prize at London School of Economics
Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 4:03pm

Anthropology alumna Caroline Federal (2012) has been awarded the prize for "Best Dissertation" for the Masters of Science in Comparative Politics program at the London School of Economics for her thesis, "Mind the Gap: Gender in National Elections in Varieties of Capitalism."

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Featured Stories

Dr. Tom Whyte and students highlighted in Appalachian magazine for archaeological research
Wednesday, October 28, 2009 - 5:16pm

Carefully digging, scraping and sifting. It's how archeologists seek clues into human history. Students at Appalachian State University learn these skills—and find cool artifacts—in a field archeology course each summer. In an Ashe County cow pasture this past summer, students led by Dr. Tom Whyte examined the earth for traces left behind by early Native Americans.

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Alumni spotlights

Sarah Stacke, Professional Photographer

The anthropology degree that she received at Appalachian has been instrumental in shaping her career as a documentary photographer.

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Faculty spotlights

Dr. Thomas R. Whyte, Professor of Anthropology

Dr. Tom Whyte’s research includes southern Appalachian prehistoric archaeology, zooarchaeology, and experimental archaeology. His recent research includes studies of animal remains from archaeological sites throughout the Southeast.

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Social Media Links

Goto the Department of Anthropology Facebook site.

Please consider donating to the Department by selecting "Other" and designating your gift for one of the following funds:

Anthropology Speaker Series
Anthropology Loucks Fund
Anthropology Weller Fund 
Anthropology Keefe Fund
Anthropology Foundation 

Your gift is appreciated and allows us to achieve even greater success with our amazing students! 

Physical Location

The Department of Anthropology is located in Anne Belk Hall. The administrative office is located in Room 342 and all of the faculty offices, classrooms, and labs are located on the 3rd floor.

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